The Flag of The United States of America

Did you know that there are special rules about handling the American flag... special rules about displaying the flag? There is so much to learn about our flag... and a lot of history to learn from the American flag. Here are some interesting links for you.

USA Flag Site is the home of all things patriotic.

Dedicated to the Flag of the US

American Legion shows the ceremonial folding the flag and the meaning of each of the 13 folds

FAQ's about Cemetery Flags, flag disposal and general flag etiquette 

Half-Staff - Information about proper display of the flag at "half-staff" during times of national mourning.

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The Flag of TEXAS, the Lone Star State

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Texas.   For Texans, and many others around the world, there's magic in that name. The first flag for the Republic of Texas was designed in 1836. The second was adopted in 1839 and retained as the Flag of the State of Texas when Texas joined the union in 1845. 

Read more on the website of the Texas State Historical Association 

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Flags of All the Countries of the World

Flags have been used in one form or another for more than 4,000 years. They were used as a means of communication, initially for military purposes and then for identifying signals at sea. They evolved to represent royal houses, then countries and other levels of government, businesses, military ranks and units, sports teams, and political parties.

   Flags of all countries

 

Join Drexel University Online and the Philadelphia Flag Day Association for an educational video exploration into the history of the American flag, narrated by former NBC10 journalist Terry Ruggles. This compelling and informative video is the perfect American history teaching tool for teachers, parents, and anyone interested in learning the intriguing history of our nation's most famous symbol.

Our Pledge

In 2002 a recording resurfaced of a monologue performed by Red Skelton, a beloved American entertainer, on his 1969 radio show. In the speech, he commented on what each line of the pledge symbolizes. Here is that moving monologue: